Author: friedman_press

Understated sophistication that aims for the heart

David Friedman’s “Weaving through motion” by Stefan Bauer | Fri, 01/09/2015 – 03:11 Understated sophistication that aims for the heart. Whoever knows me knows how fond I am of vibraphonist David Friedman’s music (though it may not be obvious from my own playing). But notwithstanding this decades-old bias, you might share my opinion that in his new solo recording “Weaving . . .” Mr Friedman is again convincing with the full weight of his irresistible sound. “His touch” would be the heading for a number of parameters that his style is composed of. The actual touch – as in attack – is the first one that comes to my mind. And mind-boggling it is still, 35+ years after I first held a Friedman album in my jittery palms (“Futures Passed”) and it first caught my ear. The German “Anschlagskultur” would be a more precise word for the ability to extract an attractive sound from a piece of metal (as well as wood, however attractive in itself already).

Vertikale Klangarchitektur

David Friedman: Weaving Through Motion Vertikale Klangarchitektur: zweites Solowerk des amerikanischen Vibrafonisten »Soloplatten sind eine wunderbare Gelegenheit, eigene Texturen zu kreieren«, freut sich der Vibrafonist und Marimbaspieler David Friedman über sein Album »Weaving Through Motion«. Es ist tatsächlich erst seine zweite Solo-CD und gleichzeitig eine Art Jubiläum. 1994 nämlich erschien Friedmans erstes Solowerk »Air Sculpture«. Natürlich war der Amerikaner in Berlin davor und seitdem nicht untätig, spielte mit Prominenz wie u. a. John Scofield, Wayne Shorter, Dino Saluzzi, Jean-Louis Matinier und Bobby McFerrin Konzerte und Alben ein. Aber eben nicht alleine. Mit Produzent Wolfgang Loos hatte er nun genügend Zeit, viele Ideen auszuprobieren, zu improvisieren, Melodien und Harmonien zu entwickeln. Durch die sorgfältige Überlagerungen einzelner Motive mittels Overdubs entstand schließlich »eine vertikale Klangarchitektur«. Die Stücke schimmern sanft, hintergründig, fast schon kontemplativ. Die vier Fremdkompositionen (u. a. Thelonious Monks »Round Midnight« und Michel Legrands »Windmills Of Your Mind«) fügen sich nahtlos an die acht Eigenkompositionen.

David Friedman and Peter Weniger

Duo Élegance

Duo Élegance David Friedman, Vibraphone Peter Weniger, Saxophone Duo Élegance is a duo project with premiere German saxophonist Peter Weniger. This unusual instrumental combination is a never- ending work in progress, ever changing, exploring, experimenting with new forms and vehicles for improvisation. It’s never about “what”, but rather more about “how”.

David Friedman with Bruckner Symphony Orchestra

In Sept. 2014 David premiered Leah Muir’s concerto for improvised vibraphone and orchestra, ‘By the Reflecting Pool’ with the Bruckner Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Dennis Russell Davies. The performance was the highlight of the ‘Ars Electronica’ festival in Linz, Austria. This work for completely improvised vibraphone is the 1/2 first of its’ kind in the history of solo performance with orchestra. In August the work was performed in Taiuyan, China with the Taiyuan Symphony Orchestra. Ms. Muir is working on a new work for David, this time for improvised vibraphone and string orchestra. A recording is planned with the Babelsberg film orchestra.

David Friedman and Rob Waring Duo

David Friedman and Rob Waring’s vibraphone and marimba duo fuses composition and improvisation in an exciting new kind of chamber music. Combining lyricism, driving rhythms, and a rich textural fabric, the playful spontaneity and freshness of their music sparks the imaginations and touches the souls of audiences wherever they perform. Management/Booking Lisbet Frøystadvåg lisbet.froy@musikforlaget.no

Melodic Improvising

David Friedman on Melodic Improvising: Transcription, Analysis, and Interview By Tristan Rogers Download the article as a PDF here In addition to being an internationally acclaimed performer and composer, vibraphonist David Friedman is probably best known to percussionists as the author of Vibraphone Technique: Dampening and Pedaling. In that study, Friedman addresses an obstacle inherent to making music on the vibraphone, which is that the vibraphone, due to its mechanical nature, is limited in terms of expressive capabilities.